Newport Jazz Festival 2018, Fort Adams, Rhode Island

Music keeps you young. One didn’t have to look further than 92-year old George Wein introducing 80 year-old Charles Lloyd on Saturday to figure that out. Wein, co-founder and patriarch of all things Newport Jazz, was delighted when Lloyd wanted to kick off his ninth decade at Newport and Wein bestowed him the honor of 2018’s artist in residence, with Lloyd performing in strikingly different musical settings over the festival’s three days.   Count myself lucky this year to cover both the Folk and Jazz weekends at the Fort and still had the glow from the Folk Festival as the town pivoted with ease from one to the other. Monday night was a table setter at the 5th Element for trumpeter Doug Woolverton and Joshua Hill, an up and coming pianist who sat in, and I would get to know better as the week went on (and so will you in the years ahead).   As with Folk the previous weekend, discoveries are at the heart of Newport Jazz. And while I consider myself pretty steeped in the stuff, I was familiar with, perhaps, a quarter of the acts coming into Friday. While Still Dreaming featuring Joshua Redman and Brian […]

Newport Jazz Festival 2016

July 29-31, 2016 Newport Jazz. Coltrane’s last performance. History that reaches back to 1954. And, yes, the oldest annual jazz festival in North America is still under the stewardship of founder George Wein for one last year. Newport, along with the Monterey Jazz Festival on the West Coast in September, stands taller than the rest and for good reason. The stunning Ft. Adams setting, the showcase for fresh directions and emerging acts, and the legacy of musical giants past and present all converge for an event that has long been on my jazz bucket list. Having the good fortune to drop in at Newport Folk the past few years, this was my first shot at Newport Jazz, which retains the stage layout from the previous week’s Folk Fest. The smallest tent is barely more than a dozen rows deep, while the largest stage is set against a backdrop of breathtaking bay and bridge views. Both events are incredibly relaxed and attendance is capped at 10K, creating one of the more intimate festival experiences of any year. Sure, the crowd and vibe skew differently between weekends, but damn if jazz isn’t alive and well in the Northeast, and a younger Millenial […]
May 23
by Jim Brock in Reviews 0 comments tags: Aaron Wilkinson, Acura Stage, alt-country, Americana, Anders Osborne, BB King tribute, Ben ellman, Big Sam Williams, Billy Gibbons, Blodie's Jazz Jam, blues, Blues Tent, Bonnie Raitt, Boz Scaggs, Brandi Carlile, Brian Blade, Buddy Guy, Carl Dufrene, Chris Mule, classic rock, Clevenger, concert photography, Congo Square Stage, Cyril Neville, Dap Kings, Dave Malone, David Shaw, Derek Trucks, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Donald Fagen, Economy Hall, Efrem Towns, Elvis Costello, Eye on the Music, Fais Do-Do Stage, Gal Holiday, Galactic, Gary Clark Jr., Gentilly Stage, Gibson SG, Gov't Mule, Gregory Porter, Herbie Hancock, Herlin Riley, hip hop, Honey Island Swamp Band, Hot 8 Brass Band, J Cole, Jack DeJohnette, jam bands, jam bands Susan Tedeschi, Janelle Monae, Jarekus Singleton, Jazz and Heritage Stage, jazz photography, Jazz Tent, Jim Brock Photography, Jim James, Jimmy Vaughn, John Hammond, Kirk Joseph, Kristin Diable, Lauryn Hill, Little Freddie King, Lost Bayou Ramblers, Mardi Gras Indian, Matt Garrison, Michael McDonald, Midnite Disturbers, Monk Boudreaux, My Morning Jacket, Nathaneil Rateliff, Neil Young, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, Nicholas Payton, Nightsweats, Paul Simon, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Promise of the Real, Radiators, Raw Oyster Cult, Revivalists, Rhiannon Giddens, roots music, Shannon Powell, Sharon Jones, Skerik, Snarky Puppy, Sonor, Soul Rebels, sousaphone, Steely Dan, Stratocaster, Subdudes, Tab Benoit, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Terence Blanchard, trombone, Voice of the Wetlands All-Stars, Walter Trout, Warren Haynes, WWOZ Jazz Tent, ZZ Top

Reflections and Musings of a Jazz Fest Photographer – 2016 Edition

  Yeah, it’s been a year of musical losses. But, Prince, the day before Jazz Fest 47 got underway? WTF? From the glyph etched in the blue above the Fair Grounds the first weekend, to the Treme second line the Monday following, to My Morning Jacket’s howling “Purple Rain” finish second Friday, Jazz Fest did its part, as it always does. “I am because he was”, Janelle Monae confessed to the Congo Square stage crowd. And whether Prince or Bowie or Toussaint or B.B. or Merle, and on and on, Fest is where the music is honored and celebrated like no other gathering on the planet, even when heaven and earth throw everything at you. And this was a Fest like no other, where Stevie Wonder’s only Fair Grounds performance was an acapella Purple Rain through a bullhorn in a deluge, and where it was impossible to tell the booming thunder above, from Neil Young and POR below. The music stuck like the deep muck of the infield and never let go. And whether on stage, dancing with a stranger, singing along, holding back tears, sharing a bite, sleeping it off, that’s just a Jazz Fest fact. This photographer took […]
May 23
by Jim Brock in Reviews 1 comments tags: Abner Ramirez, accordion, Acura Stage, Alabama Shakes, Alejandro Escovedo, Alex McMurray, Allen Toussaint, Alynda Lee Seggara, Amanda Sudano, Americana, Anders Beck, Anders Osborne, Arcade Fire, Astral Project, Avett Brother, B-3, Baritone Bliss, baritone sax, Bernard Allison, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Big Freedia, Big Sam Williams, Bill Nershi, Blodie's, Blues Tent, Bombino, Bonerama, Boz Scaggs, Brittany Howard, Casandra Faulconer, Chaka Khan, Chick Corea, Christina Aguillera, Chuck D, Cody Dickinson, concert photography, Congo Square, Cowboy Mouth, Creedence Clearwater, Dan Oestreicher, David Shaw, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Dumpstaphunk, E Street, Ed Williams, Eric Clapton, ES-335, Eye on the Music, Ezra Koenig, Fender guitar, Flavor Fav, Fred LeBlanc, Gal Holiday, Galactic, George Porter, Glen David Andrews, Greensky Bluegrass, Gregory Davis, Gregory Porter, Henry Butler, Honey Island Swamp Band, Hooray for the Riff Raff, Infamous Stringdusters, Irvin Mayfield, Ivan Neville, James Si, Jason Isbell, Jazz Fest, Jazz Tent, Jimmy Buffet, Joe Krown, John Boutte, John Fogerty, John Fohl, John Hiatt, John Thomas Griffith, Johnny Sansone, Johnny Vidacovich, JOHNNYSWIM, Jonathon Boogie Long, Keb Mo, Lakland, Laura Mvula, Led Zeppelin, Liam Tyson, Lil' Nathan, Little Freddie King, Lonnie Smith, Luther Dickinson, Lyle Lovett, Maggie Koerner, Marcia Ball, music photography, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, New Orleans music, New Orleans Suspects, Nikki Glaspie, North Mississippi Allstars, Patry, Paul Languedoc, pedal steel, Pharoah Sanders, Phish, Public Enemy, Quint Davis, Raul Malo, Reggie Scanlon, riti, Robert Earl Keen, Robert Plant, rock photography, Rodriguez, Roger Lewis, Roosevelt Collier, Runnin' Pardners, Russ Broussard, Russell Batiste, Samsung Galaxy Stage, Santana, Sensational Space Shifters, slide guitar, Soul Rebels, Southeastern, Springsteen, Stanton Moore, Stratocaster, String Cheese Incident, Sugarman, Tab Benoit, Terence Blanchard, The Mavericks, The Meters, The Nevilles, The Radiators, The Revivalists, The Wailers, Threadhead Records, Tom Morello, Tony Hall, Trey Anastasio, trombone, Trombone Shorty, Vampire Weekend, Voice of the Wetlands, Walter Wolfman Washington, Wayne Toups, Win Butler, World Boogie, Zachary Richard, zydeco, Zyedcajun

Reflections of a Wandering Jazz Fest Photographer

Years come and go. Jazz Fests do not. They endure. Each seemingly better than the last. Each its own indelible stamp on the soul. Jazz Fest 45 had everything going for it and, man, it did not disappoint. From the time the lineup dropped in January and headliner after headliner brought smiles, to the days of Fest without a drop of rain and temps in the 70s and 80s, to the ensuing butter and crawfish withdrawl, Fest 45 delivered. The big moments were big – Springsteen and New Orleans deepening their love affair, an epic crowd for Clapton, Phish’s return after 18 years and Robert Plant flashing some legend. But the small moments were big, too. Kindness spread generously throughout the Fair Grounds for seven days and musicians who were on stage one day would be roaming around the next. Locals Johnny Sansone, Irvin Mayfield and James Singleton were regularly spotted throughout the Fest. Photographer and fan frequently collide within me. Call it an occupational hazard. Stay on task, cover ground, hit my stages. But sometimes, you gotta just put the gear down and take it all in. I actually managed to do that (a little). I’ve come to the […]